Category: Interviews

Jake Gyllenhaal on his career and being Cartier’s watch ambassador

Jake Gyllenhaal on his career and being Cartier’s watch ambassador

Star2 – Integrity, dedication and boundless curiosity – Jake Gyllenhaal is said to embody all those qualities as the new face of the Santos de Cartier timepiece. And rightly so, for the man indeed has a pioneering spirit.

Gyllenhaal is regarded as one of the most adventurous actors of his generation. His roles span a wide spectrum: from troubled teenager in 2001 cult hit Donnie Darko to Brokeback Mountain’s conflicted, repressed sheep herder.

According to him, the latter remains as a favourite. Speaking to Star2.com via email, the 37-year-old says that the fearlessness of the film’s two characters was a lesson for everyone, especially when it came out in 2005.

While Gyllenhaal received an Oscar nomination and won a Bafta for Brokeback Mountain, he also looks fondly on his more recent work – a 2017 biographical drama of a man who loses his legs in the Boston Marathon bombing.

I think of Jeff Bauman, who I played in Stronger. I admire him because of his inexplicable strength and his sense of humour in the face of enormous tragedy,Gyllenhaal states.

With his production company Nine Stories, he is on the way to becoming a filmmaker of note as well – from sourcing material to developing it from the ground up and collaborating with bold storytellers.

Regarding the foray into directing, Gyllenhaal points out that he sees it as merely a natural progression to growing up, and not at all – as some would assume – a move forward from acting.

I think it takes maturity and a knowledge of oneself to be able to actually tell a story, to be at the helm of a project. I believe it takes a while to cultivate the ability to actually direct a film, so it feels like the natural movement as a human, for me, not as an actor.

His other notable works include 2014’s Nightcrawler, which he also produced. Playing an investigative crime journalist who will stop at nothing to get the story, he received a Bafta, Golden Globe, SAG, Critics’ Choice and Independent Spirit Award nomination for it.

Within that same year, Gyllenhaal made his Broadway debut in Constellations and musical theatre debut in Little Shop Of Horrors. It was his first stage performance since 2002, when he starred in the revival of This Is Our Youth on London’s West End.

So how does he juggle it all? Gyllenhaal is constantly surrounded by the people who really matter. His family and friends are the ones who have played a big role in keeping him from careening off course.

I always spend time with them, doing what they do, and that helps me pace myself. You can get overwhelmed by the work that you do and consumed with it, but when you look outward, like my mom would say, it’s like taking a breath,” he explains.

Timely Parnership

When it comes to his role as the latest watch ambassador for Cartier, Gyllenhaal says that it began when the luxury brand approached him and communicated the idea of creating an advertisement to convey a “bold and fearless” message.

They were looking for someone who they believe personified those qualities in their spirit and in their work. They knew that I was someone who loved the process of artistic collaboration … and so the journey began.

Moreover, when we first spoke about the Santos watch, the ways in which it was invented, how it was created out of a great collaboration, it all seemed kismet,Gyllenhaal relates.

The Santos de Cartier timepiece is reportedly the first purpose-­made wristwatch, designed by Louis Cartier for his friend Alberto Santos-Dumont, the Brazilian adventurer who mastered, unaided, heavier-than-air powered flight in 1906.

It originally went on sale in 1911 and has remained a mainstay of Cartier’s watches. Receiving a bold update in the late 1970s, the design is seen as perennially innovative – in face of changing times.

Gyllenhaal however, would like to think of it as a celebration of two great minds coming together. The watch, he notes, represents the spirit of mutual respect between Cartier and Santos-Dumont.

The Santos is a collaboration of art and science really, a collaboration of form and function. I think we can have an inspired idea about something, but I think in order for it to last, it has to be built on something solid, a foundation that can be proven, a solvable equation.

Retaining its original square shape, this year’s model pays homage to classical Parisian geometry, while the screws, visible along the bezel and metal strap links, acknowledge the imposing steel structures of the period.

As it is, Gyllenhaal believes that watches will always remain as an essential accessory. He says men don’t generally have a lot options when it comes to expressing themselves fashion-wise.

I also think that there’s something about the watch that represents being a grown up. When you see a man with a watch, I think it immediately projects a sense of maturity, particularly a watch that’s crafted like the Santos,” he enthuses.

As Cartier’s newly appointed face, Gyllenhaal also stars in a short film highlighting Santos-Dumont’s intrepid, thrill-seeking legacy. Told in 60 seconds, it captures the excitement of adventure and the historic, almost mystical pursuit of take-off.

 

Jake Gyllenhaal for GQ Australia

Jake Gyllenhaal for GQ Australia

Jake Gyllenhaal is looking handsome as always in the new photoshoot for GQ Australia, he also gave a interview for the magazine.  Check the pictures in our gallery and read the interview below:

In a chic New York office, Jake Gyllenhaal is sitting alongside a man named Jeff Bauman. Bauman is an author, a motivational speaker and an advocate but is best known as a man who lost both legs in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing. During his rehabilitation, he also became a rare beacon of hope, shining out of a dark tragedy.

The pair are interviewing each other for a Facebook Q&A, as part of the promotion for Stronger, the movie adaptation of Bauman’s best-selling book of the same name, which he co-wrote in the aftermath of the attack.

Gyllenhaal portrays Bauman in the film, a role which has already garnered attention this awards season. The interview looks to be your typical junket fare – a bit of back and forth about the film, before those involved simply sit back and take turns blowing smoke up each other’s arses. But it’s not.

The actor earnestly introduces Bauman, who is wearing cut-off shorts that expose his prosthetic legs. “I can start off,” suggests Bauman, before launching into his first question. “You know Van Wilder, right? Ryan Reynolds? I really wanted him to play me. I was just wondering why he didn’t.”

There’s a comic pause, as Gyllenhaal recoils in mock-astonishment. “He would have been better, I think,” adds Bauman.

It’s hilarious. This, in a nutshell, sums up the friendship the two men have forged over the past two-and-a-half years. “Full-on piss-taking, left and right,” laughs Gyllenhaal. As it happens, Gyllenhaal and Reynolds are BFFs. They co-starred last year in the movie Life and each own loft apartments in the same converted factory building in Manhattan.

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W Magazine’s Best Performances

W Magazine’s Best Performances

Jake Gyllenhaal is part of W Magazine annual Best Performances. The photoshoot is in our gallery.

Jake Gyllenhaal in Stronger

“My dad always told me, ‘The job of an artist is to disturb the comfortable and comfort the disturbed.’ That’s always in my mind. It’s why I’m attracted to projects that are maybe going to illuminate something to you about yourself. It’s always a little frightening because you don’t know what you’re going to discover.”

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Jake Gyllenhaal on ‘proudest’ moment ‘Stronger’ and his ambitious producing plans

Jake Gyllenhaal on ‘proudest’ moment ‘Stronger’ and his ambitious producing plans

Jake Gyllenhaal’s committed performance as Boston marathon blast victim Jeff Bauman in Stronger is generating awards heat. The actor tells Screen about the challenges and rewards of stepping up to produce the film.

Though Jake Gyllenhaal played the lead role in Stronger, a drama about real-life Boston bombing victim Jeff Bauman, he seems more excited to talk about his role as a producer. “I’ve put two-and-a-half years of my life into this movie, far beyond the performance of it,” he tells Screen International. “I’ve learned more about myself producing this film and about the film industry than I ever learned before. I’m more proud of it than anything else I’ve ever made, as a result.”

Stronger is the first release from Nine Stories, the production company he founded with Riva Marker in 2015. With projects already lined up with the likes of Luca Guadagnino and Denis Villeneuve, the actor admits this side of the business comes easily to him.

“I grew up in a world of filmmakers, so there’s a real understanding of the process of casting, financing and location scouting,” says Gyllenhaal, the son of a director (Stephen) and a screenwriter (Naomi Foner). “I didn’t grow up understanding the side of the actor. They were always these strange beasts who were brought onto the island at the last minute; I felt much more familiar with the creation of the film as a whole. I revel in the restless, continual failure with small triumphs that is producing.”

Making Stronger

In 2013, 27-year-old Bauman lost his legs below the knee in the terror attack at the Boston marathon. A working-class Boston local who was at the marathon to win back his girlfriend Erin (played in the film by Tatiana Maslany), he became famous firstly for Charles Krupa’s graphic photo of him after the blast, then for his honest account of his rehabilitation in his memoir Stronger, co-written with Bret Witter.

Gyllenhaal was interested in the role even before Bauman’s memoir hit the bestseller lists. Todd Lieberman at Mandeville Films bought the rights to the story, and an early version of the script by John Pollono found its way to Gyllenhaal. He explains: “I called Erik Feig at Lionsgate and said, ‘I love this role,’ just as an actor at that point. They said, ‘Let’s find a filmmaker first and we’ll come back to you.’”

Lionsgate picked the versatile David Gordon Green (George Washington, Pineapple Express). He was keen on Gyllenhaal, but financing started to slip, reportedly because it clashed with fellow Boston bombing project Patriots Day, also from Lionsgate with CBS Films. “Nine Stories had just made a deal with Bold Films [which has since been extended until 2020] who produced and financed Nightcrawler, Whiplash, Drive and all those other movies,” says Gyllenhaal. “As Stronger was waning I slipped them the script, said, ‘Do you want to finance this with us,’ and they said, ‘Yes.’ All of a sudden my company was involved in producing a film.” Lionsgate remained as the film’s worldwide distributor, with Roadside Attractions handling in the US.

No ‘BS’

Once in production, one of the tasks for Gyllenhaal and Gordon Green was to ensure the film wasn’t a “conventional inspirational story”. “The alarm bell would ring at times,” admits Gyllenhaal. “Things like music cues, behavioural choices… David and I were very specific about the honesty of moments. A lot of that had to do with his technique — rolling for long periods of time.”

Various people from Bauman’s story were also cast as themselves, including Dr Jeffrey Kalish, his real doctor from Boston Medical Center, and Paul and Greg Martino of United Prosthetics who designed Bauman’s artificial legs. “They checked us, and Jeff was constantly checking the bullshit meter,” adds Gyllenhaal, who spent almost a year hanging out with Bauman before the production started. “That’s who he is. The mentality of Boston is also about not faking it, but trying to be honest. We knew we’d get a lot of shit if we didn’t do that.” Understandably, Bauman did not visit the set, but he did stay in contact with Gyllenhaal throughout.

For Gyllenhaal to realistically portray someone with Bauman’s disability, a complicated mix of CGI and practical solutions were required. He describes one deceptively simple scene where Bauman goes into his apartment on his wheelchair and gets into the bath. “The bathroom scene is a microcosm of every department that made this film work… it was a mind-meld,” says Gyllenhaal.

The opening shot required a wheelchair custom-built by the props team that hid the actor’s lower legs. Transferring to the bath saw his legs digitally removed by the visual-effects team, but in the next shot his legs were hidden in a specially built tub, before an overhead shot once again used digital effects.

Gyllenhaal also spent a lot of time trying to replicate the unique leg movement of someone with Bauman’s injuries. “What I noticed after spending so much time with Jeff without his prostheses,” says Gyllenhaal, “was that the abdomen muscles move the legs very fast, because they don’t have the weight of the rest of the legs. It’s a flipping movement that you haven’t seen in movies very much but is a staple for anyone with this disability to deal with.”

Busy slate

In recent years Gyllenhaal has shown a knack for picking interesting roles with distinctive filmmakers, from Nightcrawler with Dan Gilroy, to Nocturnal Animals with Tom Ford and Okja with Bong Joon Ho. “There was a time in my career where I was a little less conscious of the choices I was making; I maybe felt that [my career] was something that could last,” he explains. “Then I came to the conclusion that it was something that could actually go away… I’ve learned what my strengths and weaknesses are, and I moved towards relationships with filmmakers, that’s what’s changed. Some of those [directors] at the time weren’t the most popular people to everyone else.”

He is referring to Villeneuve, now an A-list director after Arrival, Sicario and Blade Runner 2049. Gyllenhaal worked with him on Prisoners and Enemy (both 2013) and the duo will reunite with The Son, a Nine Stories project based on the book by Jo Nesbo. Gyllenhaal says they are in the middle of the script and are “moving quickly”. “I understand what high demand Denis is in, but I also understand my relationship with him,” he says. “We worked together before all of Hollywood was obsessed with him, so I think he is loyal in that way.”

Other titles Gyllenhaal is starring in and producing are Paul Dano’s directing debut Wildlife; Stephen Gaghan’s videogame adaptation The DivisionThe Anarchists Vs ISIS directed by Daniel Espinosa; and Rio, from Call Me By Your Name’s Guadagnino and co-starring Benedict Cumberbatch.

The actor is also developing projects he will not act in, including a series for A&E on cults throughout history; Alex Timbers’ Theatre Of War, based on an episode of Ira Glass’s radio series This American Life; Michael Showalter’s The Last Ride Of Cowboy Bob; and The Good Time Girls, directed by Courtney Hoffman and starring Laura Dern.

“My intention of starting a production company was not to generate material for myself,” he says. “It was to champion filmmakers and then have an acting career separately. Producing allows me to devote myself as an actor for hire even more intensely and with more respect for directors because I have a whole other outlet as a filmmaker. That’s the blessing of it.”

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Actors On Actors: Jake Gyllenhaal & Margot Robbie

Actors On Actors: Jake Gyllenhaal & Margot Robbie

Jake is featured on the  Variety’s “Actors on Actors” series with Margot Robbie. They sat down to talk about playing real-life people, separating fame from their personal lives, and more. Bellow you can read the article published on Vanity Fair’s site and watch their interview:

Home > Magazine Scans > 2017 > November 28 │ Variety Magazine

Margot Robbie and Jake Gyllenhaal on Separating Fame From Their Personal Lives

Margot Robbie (“I, Tonya”) and Jake Gyllenhaal (“Stronger”) sat down for a chat for Variety‘s “Actors on Actors” presented by Google Home, which airs Jan. 2 to Jan. 4 at 7 p.m. on PBS SoCal KOCE.

Margot Robbie: You’ve been in the business a lot longer than I have. Your first job was when you were 11?

Jake Gyllenhaal: Eleven.

Robbie: Was there a conscious choice to become an actor? If no one in your family was in the business, do you think you would have found your way into the business anyway? Or do you ever wonder what you’d be doing if you weren’t doing this?

Gyllenhaal: Absolutely. You ask those questions at different times. But I think that it’s this crazy blessing that is really a lot about luck, and that makes me feel very grateful. But being around this business my whole life, I think there are a lot of aspects that feel like family. I think we all come to this space one way or another to find different families. It’s interesting in thinking about these two characters [Olympic figure skater Tonya Harding and Boston Marathon bombing survivor Jeff Bauman]: They were both kind of thrust into the spotlight in a particular way — for your character, because of her choice and then also because of the event that happened.

Robbie: Something [Tonya] asked me about when we met, she said, “How are you dealing with fame and being famous?” And actually, it was very kind of her to ask. Because to be honest, her situation was horrible, and it happened to her so young, and I think what made the biggest difference in the world was she didn’t have a support network around her. And I do, and I’m so lucky. I didn’t start working professionally until I finished high school. I had a very clear bookend from my childhood to my adulthood — from my life outside of the film business and my life inside.

Gyllenhaal: You have always been very clear about that. Separating those two.

Robbie: It’s bittersweet living outside of Australia, because I miss everyone so much, but the fact that they are so removed from it helps me keep my life and my work separate — even though they are intrinsically linked, because all I want to do is work all the time. But becoming famous at [Tonya’s] age without a support network around her, and without a clear distinction, I think would have been incredibly difficult.

Gyllenhaal: I think that’s true. I learned from Jeff that he didn’t ask for those things — he didn’t ask for the attention and to become that thing, but he has slowly evolved into being able to hold that idea for people.

Robbie: I was in tears in the moment when he’s at the Red Sox game and you can just see that he suddenly realizes the responsibility he has and the positive impact he can have on the people around him by just listening to their story and shaking their hand. And I was bawling by that part.

Gyllenhaal: Thank you. That’s really sweet of you to say. I think that movies can bring joy. And that’s what I feel Jeff showed me, is his spirit, when you get touched by him, or you’re around him, or you know if he were here, you’d feel so happy to be alive. Also he has such a great sense of humor and makes all my petty crap seem like petty crap. I think he always just puts it in perspective for me.

Robbie: I feel like there are similarities in what we went through and that we were both playing real-life people in a situation that didn’t happen that long ago. And there’s obviously the added responsibility when you play a real-life person who’s still alive. How was it playing Jeff, and playing a real-life person, and just that story in general?

Gyllenhaal: It was a huge responsibility. I felt a pressure beyond a pressure I’ve ever felt in terms of playing a character because you’re, like you said, you know you want to do the situation the service that it deserves. You spent time with Tonya?

Robbie: Not the way I think you might have [with Jeff]. I actually wanted to keep a bit of distance. I knew that if I met her and liked her, I would never play this character properly. I would be sugarcoating her flaws; I’d be trying to justify the bad things that she may do or say in a situation. And I didn’t want to do that. So there was the character of Tonya, and then there was the person [whose story] I’m telling, and there’s the responsibility to do their story justice. It’s a weird thing to try and make something entertaining. And entertaining doesn’t always mean funny or happy.

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